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  • Sara Thompson

Carnations Bring Color

By Sara Thompson

Yakovlev Sergey, Wikimedia Commons

Special to the Enterprise


Carnations are one of the most common flowers in bouquets, including for Valentine’s Day. Used most often to express love or grace, they also can also be used to symbolize gratitude, purity, a mother’s love, and more. These flowers are native to regions surrounding the Mediterranean, but their exact range is unknown as they have been cultivated for over 2000 years.


The pedals of carnations have a radial symmetry and they come in a variety of colors. They are naturally a bright pinkish-purple but have been cultivated and hybridized to create colors of red, yellow, green, white, and true pink. Blues and darker purples are done through genetic engineering or dying.


Carnations produce a scent that is described as clove-like. This aroma make it a popular choice for perfumes. Other than looking and smelling good, carnations have also been used for eating. While it is not recommended to eat any carnation you find, if raised in clean conditions and properly prepared, carnations have been used in beers, wines, vinegar, sauces, and in salads.


The next time you are looking to give someone a bouquet, consider a carnation. They have had the admiration of people all over the world for thousands of years and with so many color options, you are sure to find a something your loved one will adore.

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• Spring school programming book up fast so call now. For more information, please visit https://www.explorit.org/programs. To reserve call (530) 756-0191.


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